Carl's
Gallery of

Red Arch from Canyonlands

National Parks

Utah

Arizona

California

California's East Slope

Colorado

Idaho

Montana

Nevada

New Mexico

Utah

Canadian Rockies West

Canadian Rockies East

Using Drones for Aerial Photography

Phantom Seen From Below

Landscape DA Jet Trails
Arches National Park
As viewed from the helicopter.
Bryce Canyon National Park
Mesa at Distant Cliff.
Canyonlands National Park

Main Formation with Telephoto Lens of
Capitol Reef National Park
Near Vistor Center
Cedar Breaks National Monument
Oh look, a bird with TEETH!!!
Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry
Looking up thru Double Arches.
Cottonwood Canyon Road and the Grosvenor Arch
Dinosaur Quarry And Display
Dinosaur National Monument ~ Vernal, Utah
Falls as seen from Left.
Escalante, Boulder and the Hole in the Rock Trail in Utah
Intrate Formations, Fantasy Canyon
Fantasy Canyon
Uintah County, Utah
Sandstone Spire and Ridge.
Kodachrome Basin State Park
Car entering.
Kolob Canyons in Zion National Park
Flying Lawn Mowers above river and formation.
Moab, Utah

Totem Pole Yei Be Chei by Telephoto Lens.
Monument Valley

Panorama of Spotted Wolf Canyon.
San Rafael Swell
Mexican Hard Rock close up.
Valley of the Gods
Zion Giant Arch
Zion National Park
 

Arches National Park

Aches National Park has a multitude of massive sandstone arches ranging in size right up to three hundred feet. Landscape arch (the 300-foot span) is generally considered the longest natural arch in the world. Some formations have multiple arches in a single formation (Double Arch) and the champion of all is the huge arch known as Delicate arch, which sits atop a mountain!

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Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon in Southern Utah is a twenty-five mile long sheer cliff of sandstone, whose multicolored layers expose millions of years of geologic history. A road connects key overlooks to allow the views below, and what we see from a helicopter is breathtaking.

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Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands National Park covers a huge area, and is divided into three sections. The northern section, which is near Arches National Park, is both accessible and spectacular. It has miles of cliffs which a photographer can walk right up to. The views from these cliffs seem to extend for many miles--a bonanza for the photographer.

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Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef is somewhat different from many other national parks I have visited. First, it is enormous in expanse, occupying a major area of eastern Utah. 
Secondly, while there is a nicely paved entry road, and an easily-accessed ten-mile drive lined with intensely colorful sandstone formations, the unique major attractions lie in a vast, isolated and unimproved area to the North.

Upper and Lower Cathedral Valley are the gems of Capital Reef, yet they are inaccessible to passenger car because a river must be forded and the roads are dirt. For these reasons, only a very minute fraction of the visitors to the main park see these attractions.

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Cedar Breaks National Monument

Cedar Breaks National Monument is a park which lies to the West of Bryce Canyon, and is considered a smaller relative to that twenty-five-mile long formation. Cedar Breaks was formed by the same forces which created Bryce, simply on a smaller scale--though it is still a very impressive canyon, exposing millions of years of geologic history.

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Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry

This is a working quarry, where paleontologists exhume dinosaur bones and bring them into laboratories for study. The resulting exhibits are then shown in museums around the world.

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Cottonwood Canyon Road and the Grosvenor Arch

Cottonwood Canyon Road runs South from Cannonville (a few miles East of the Bryce Canyon National Park) through the Grand Staircase Escalante and the southern portion of Capitol Reef National Park.

The road is described as ‘unimproved,’ a definite euphemism as one drives South past the paved portion, which ends at Kodachrome Basin State Park.

The Arch was first described in a National Geographic article after a 1948 expedition to explore Kodachrome Basin and the Arch. The Arch was then named for Gilbert Grosvenor, for many years the Chairman of the National Geographic Society.

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Dinosaur National Monument ~ Vernal, Utah

Dinosaur National Monument is sometimes called ‘The quietest place in America.’ There are no jets flying overhead, few cars and almost no people. River rafters quietly drift down two huge river systems, and the few guests who come to this remote corner of northeastern Utah have the rivers, the roads and the high overlooks to themselves.

When one stands high on one of several overlooks, seeing 100 miles or more, one realizes that this is a special gem of the National Park System.
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Escalante, Boulder and the Hole in the Rock Trail in Utah

This rugged part of Utah has some brilliantly colorful and exceptionally harsh terrain. Escalante is the entryway to Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, and some of the roads leading from Escalante and Boulder lead through the Grand Staircase on into Capitol Reef National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.

The visitor to Escalante and Boulder will be able to access such stunning attractions as Hell’s Backbone Bridge, the Hole in the Rock Trail, the Lower Calf Creek Falls, the Head of the Rocks Vista, The ‘Most Beautiful Road in America’ and other photographic gems. I have put them all in separate galleries for easy access, and hope you enjoy them.

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Fantasy Canyon, Uintah County, Utah

Fantasy Canyon is a very small valley populated with hundreds of eroded formations. Many seem like stone gargoyles, and almost all of them are very intricate, composed of many separate pieces of varied sandstones.
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Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area

Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area is a federal zone around the flaming Gorge Dam and the 90-mile long reservoir built up behind it. The huge body of water makes its way through deep gorges in the South, then spreads out in rolling hills as it extends into Wyoming at its northern end. Especially in the South, the geology around the reservoir is both varied and dramatic.
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Goblin Valley and Nearby Attractions

Goblin Valley State Park, Utah

Goblin Valley is a small park, a small valley in which hundreds of sandstone formations have been eroded and weathered until they look like a goblin army marching across the sand.

The park has an elevated viewing area to look out across the army of stone figures, and visitors can freely walk down into the valley amid the formations to see them at close range.

Little Wild Horse Canyon—Introduction

This is one of several famous slot canyons in the southwest. Sunlight reflecting off the complex faces of the walls as it penetrates the slots creates all kinds of color effects.

Add to that the scouring action of flash floods polishing and shaping the walls, and we find each section of the canyon a new work of art.

and Crystal Geyser

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Kodachrome Basin State Park

This small park lies within a ring of imposing cliffs, and represents the erosion of the softer sandstone within the basin while the surrounding hills endured.

This site was first named and publicized by a 1948 National Geographic expedition. The park lies ten miles South of Cannonville, Utah, which lies a few miles East of famed Bryce Canyon National Park. The National Geographic team named the park for a new Kodak film which was just becoming available. The film, which I used for decades, was particularly effective in rendering reds and yellows.

Though overshadowed by the more famous Bryce Canyon, this small park is a remarkable collection of formations in a small, easily-accessed place.

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Kolob Canyons in Zion National Park

Kolob Canyons is actually the northernmost corner of Zion National Park. but is far enough away that it has its own entrance and park services. It is an immense valley with a massive cliff of sandstone that extends for miles. Scenic overlooks offer views of tall formations with sheer vertical sides and rich colors of sandstone.

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Clck Here for Moab, Utah ~ Fall 2011 & Fall 2014

Moab is a small town of about 5,000 (as of the 2000 Census) in East/central Utah, set in some of the West’s most varied and impressive scenery.

I drove across from Las Vegas, which brought me past two stellar attractions, the enormous anticline formation and cliff known as the San Rafael Swell and the huge canyon of the San Rafael River known as The Wedge.

Moab lies at the intersection of Route 191 (which runs roughly North/South) and the Colorado River (running roughly East/West).

Approaching Moab from the north, you pass the entrance to the Island in the Sky (northern) portion of Canyonlands National Park. That same exit takes you to the spectacular overlook at Dead Horse Point.

Just North of town, you pass the entrance to Arches National Park.

Entering the commercial center of Moab, you cross over the Colorado River. Near that intersection, a road to the West (Potash Road) follows the Colorado between high sandstone cliffs which attract rock climbers on weekends.

If instead you choose to follow the Colorado River to the East on route 128, you enjoy twenty-five miles of river, soaring cliffs and strategic overlooks which locals call Red Canyon.

A few miles out on Rt. 128, a road on the right leads to the community of Castle Valley and a sixty-mile loop up through the 12,000-foot peaks of the Manti-LaSal mountain range.

If instead you go South through town and continue on the 191, there are two roads off to the right to the Needles portion of Canyonlands. The first road leads to two spectacular overlooks. The Anticline Overlook gives you a view over the vast chasm of the Colorado Basin toward Dead Horse Point and Islands in the Sky. The other branch of that first road leads to the Needles Overlook—which looks out over the central portion of Canyonlands.

Finally, another road (Route 211), Squaw Flats Road, takes you right down into the canyons of the Needles District.

It would be easy to spend two or three very productive weeks photographing all this, and I highly recommend it to everyone with a sense of beauty and adventure!

By the way, there is now a YouTube video!

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Monument Valley

In the southeastern corner of Utah are found a cluster of fascinating parks. The most famous of these is Monument Valley, a colossal span of desert which is filled with many thousand-foot towers of sandstone rising from the valley floor. This valley has formed the scenic backdrop for countless western films because of its breathtaking scope, color and sweep.

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Natural Bridges National Monument, the  Moki Dugway and Goosenecks State Park

When we leave the Valley of the Gods going North, we must get up the huge escarpment which forms a formidable barrier. A switchback road called the Moki Dugway was constructed in 1958; it now offers easy access to the Natural Bridges National Monument. Natural bridges and arches are formed differently. Arches are created by countless cycles of water freezing and thawing in cracks in sandstone mountains. Natural bridges are formed when a winding curve of river (similar to those in the Goosenecks images) breaks through a wall and cuts an entire loop out of the river’s course. In Natural Bridges National Monument there are three such bridges. The most accessible is the Owachomo Bridge, which visitors can easily hike to and enjoy the soaring structure rising above them.

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San Rafael Swell

Driving across southern Utah on Route 70 from Las Vegas brings us past several stellar attractions. To the north of the highway about fifty miles is the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry. Not far from the Quarry we drive onto a spectacular overlook above the vast canyon of the San Rafael River known as The Wedge. Utahns call this ‘Utah’s Grand Canyon.

Then we cross the enormous anticline formation and cliff known as the San Rafael Swell, a gigantic fold in the Earth’s crust caused by the collision of two tectonic plates. There is along, winding passage down off the highlands through Spotted Wolf Canyon.

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Valley of the Gods

Valley of the Gods is a smaller version of Monument Valley whose towers are perhaps 600 feet tall. They stand off the base of a huge escarpment which is a magnificent platform for photography The Valley also has a winding road though it which offers close access to the massive formations.top

 

Zion National Park

Zion National Park has a main valley surrounded by sheer walls and tall peaks. At a site called Big Bend, those mountains tower on all sides. There is a side road through a long tunnel through the mountains. There is a side road that leads to a long tunnel, which was  dug through the solid mountain during the Depression era. The view from atop the arch is the best in the park.
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Carl Roessler
P.O. Box 33668
Las Vegas, NV 89133
voice: 702.562.0226
fax: 702.562.0227

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